Taiwan ROCKs Seattle 2017

group photoIt’s always hard to say good-bye. My daughter and I spent a weekend in Seattle, WA for the annual Taiwan ROCKs event where adoptive families with kids from Taiwan get together, catch up on each others’ lives, and make some fun memories. Each year, the event is held in a different city. There were about 16 families and 25 kids adopted from Taiwan, not including non-adopted siblings, and one sibling adopted from the DRC. We’re now heading back to CA. It was an experience I’ll always treasure. We met so many wonderful families!

The event began on Friday night with a pizza fest at Angle Lake, a park within walking distance from our hotel. There were water features + playground equipment, and the kids looked like they were having the time of their lives. This year’s event was organized by Molly Gleason O’Brien and Kerry Murphy, two local moms. Lexie and I were warmly welcomed and were struck by the support and friendships extended to us. I was pleasantly surprised when I saw Tien, the very woman who helped me find my birth family in Taipei, standing across the way talking to a family. Then it dawned on me that Tien lives in Seattle – I’d forgotten! Almost every family there, if not all, were connected to Tien in some way. We spent the afternoon with Tien yesterday touring the city and eating lunch. It was lovely to spend time with her after our trip to Taiwan together in 2012, 5 years ago. My how time has flown!

TienOn Saturday evening, I talked to the group after a BBQ dinner about my new book, “Beyond Two Worlds: A Taiwanese-American Adoptee’s Memoir & Search for Identity.” My heart melted afterwards when young adoptees came to introduce themselves and get a copy of my book. The best part of the trip was getting to know these kiddos and their parents. We talked about how much international adoption has changed since the era when I and many other adult adoptees were adopted. I was struck by how many families had already taken their kids back to Taiwan. Some adoptees had the opportunity to meet their birth mothers and extended biological families. The trips were prompted by their kids’ curiosity about their early beginnings. It was unheard of years ago for adoptive parents to encourage their kids to explore their birth cultures. I found that the parents at the event are well-educated and culturally sensitive. They understand the importance of open dialogue with their kids. I was very inspired by the support the families provide to each other and to their kids as they continue to ask questions about their birth heritage. One mom told me that her daughter, age 11, wrote an essay about her adoption/birth family and loved to write. Most of the adoptees fell between the ages of 6-10. It was such a great pleasure to talk with them and learn their stories. Some of the other evenings events included rock painting and slime-making!

Taiwan ROCKs has approximately 400 families within its network. I was told that the Seattle ROCKs event was one of the smallest compared to past years. Nevertheless, I enjoyed every minute of it. Tien told me she believed that approximately 1,000 Taiwanese adoptions have occurred since the 1990’s, and most likely more, including adoptions that were private, or occurred without the assistance of an agency. Adoptions from Taiwan have declined significantly, as have international adoptions across all countries. There is a whole generation of young Taiwanese adoptees who I hope one day will support one another and perhaps even write their own memoirs! Thank you to the families who attended Taiwan ROCKS 2017 for your support and for making Lexie and I feel like a part of the group! We hope to keep in touch.

3 thoughts on “Taiwan ROCKs Seattle 2017

  1. Julia

    I had a few more thoughts while reading your post again:
    My daughter has friends who are adopted from China who have been taking Chinese language classes for years and can speak it fluently. Their mom tried to take the classes also, but eventually gave up. When my daughter told me that, I thought how nice that was and it showed a nice progression in the international adoption community.

    In the last 10 years I’ve seen more Asian Adoptees with their families. My heart always wants to speak with them, but I don’t for various reasons.

    It’s so nice that you were able to see Tien. What a great surprise!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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