roots

kyle-ellefson-196125It’s been almost two months since I began my new job as a child therapist. Man, has it been an adjustment. I can’t say that it’s what I expected…much more stressful than I anticipated. I’m often unsure of myself and how to help the client sitting in front of me. That being said, I guess all new therapists feel that to some degree.

Since I began my blog on international adoption, I’ve received emails from other adoptees, primarily adult adoptees from Taiwan, who are contemplating or in the process of searching for their birthfamilies. I’m thrilled to offer my own experiences, support, encouragement, and to connect with other adoptees. Some have found members of their birthfamilies in Taiwan with the help of the Child & Juvenile Adoption Information Center in Taipei. I received an email from an adoptee recently who found her biological brother, but also learned that she has a sister who was adopted to U.S. parents. She now wants to find her sister. I wish that I could make the process easier. It is difficult to conduct a search when there are very few leads. If only we had the information that we long for.

It is truly a journey to begin a search for your birthfamily. It is one that I do not regret. I talk to adoptees often about what it’s like for them to be adopted. Some do not have a desire to search for their birthfamilies. I didn’t for many, many years. A specific event in my life changed all of that, and I never went back. There is something deep inside many of us that longs to know, understand, connect to our roots. It may come much later in life, or it may start at a very young age (or as I mentioned before, it’s not as important to others). Call them spiritual roots, biological roots, whatever you want – we desire a connection to where it all began for us. The kids I work with in foster care no matter how much they suffered at the hand of their parents still want to be with their mother and/or father. Even if it’s explained to them why they are in foster care, in many cases, they still long to be with their biological families. There’s a story that I read to kids, “The Invisible String,” to help them understand that no matter who they are separated from, there’s an invisible string that connects them to those they love. It seems like such a very, very small thing to offer in comparison to the huge hole that’s been created in their hearts, but it is a way to help them feel connected in spirit. I understand that desire to search for your roots or to stay connected. I’ve said it before – I cannot imagine having never found my biological family. I wish that I could travel more often to see them in Taipei. And I wish that I had the time to learn Mandarin.

Lately, I’ve felt so disconnected to my own birth roots. Work, life, busyness complicates everything, and I miss being involved to a greater capacity in international adoption. I was happy to receive that email from the adoptee searching for her sister. It helps me to feel connected to my own roots, to appreciate the invisible string that connects me to my birthfamily in Taiwan and to other adoptees I wish my fellow adoptee all the best in her continued search.

Photo by Kyle Ellefson on Unsplash

8 thoughts on “roots

  1. anewmoon123

    Thank you for your latest post, MJ. Pace yourself as best as you can in your new career. The burnout is definitely a part of the career. I hope you have someone to be your mentor/supervisor on this new journey.

    Your gift to adoptees is without measure. Your gift is God-given.

    Keep writing when you can. Love to you, MJ. xoxo Carole Ann

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  2. Julia

    Here are the links I see suggested most on the Search Squad page concerning DNA testing.

    http://dna.ancestry.com/
    https://www.23andme.com/

    I’m not sure how effective this will be concerning international adoption, but would definitely be worth a shot. I don’t think this is available in Taiwan right now.

    Someone did share this in a group that I am part of. Of course, I can’t read it since it’s mostly in Chinese. 😦 I think it may be something new in Taiwan & similar to the ancestry & 23andme websites that I told you of.
    https://www.facebook.com/Taiwan-Ancestry-DNA-testing-103895129675804/

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  3. jazzygirl Post author

    Thanks for sharing, Julia! I’ll pass along…I don’t know much about DNA testing, but I know that it’s becoming more and more popular. There was a male adoptee that I had contact with who found his bio family through DNA testing. Thanks for stopping by and I definitely want to check out the process for DNA testing!

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